Pitch That Killed

  • Title: Pitch That Killed
  • Author: Mike Sowell
  • ISBN: 9780026124102
  • Page: 490
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Pitch That Killed The story of Ray Chapman of the Cleveland Indians a popular player struck in the head and killed in August by a pitch thrown by Carl Mays of the New York Yankees Mr Sowell s book investigates th
    The story of Ray Chapman of the Cleveland Indians, a popular player struck in the head and killed in August 1920 by a pitch thrown by Carl Mays of the New York Yankees Mr Sowell s book investigates the incident and probes deep into the backgrounds of the players involved and the events that led to baseball s only death at bat A New York Times Notable Book of the Year SThe story of Ray Chapman of the Cleveland Indians, a popular player struck in the head and killed in August 1920 by a pitch thrown by Carl Mays of the New York Yankees Mr Sowell s book investigates the incident and probes deep into the backgrounds of the players involved and the events that led to baseball s only death at bat A New York Times Notable Book of the Year Splendidly researched and vivid as todaymarkable Roger Kahn

    • [PDF] Download ☆ Pitch That Killed | by ✓ Mike Sowell
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      Posted by:Mike Sowell
      Published :2019-07-02T22:28:25+00:00

    About Mike Sowell


    1. Mike Sowell Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Pitch That Killed book, this is one of the most wanted Mike Sowell author readers around the world.


    221 Comments


    1. Most baseball fans know about Ray Chapman being the only player to die because of an on-the-field incident when he was beaned by Carl Mays. These same fans may also know that he was very popular, not just with the fans of the Cleveland Indians but also is teammates. Then they may also be aware that Mays was not very popular, even before this tragedy, with the players, teammates and opponents alike. Just these topics would make a good book, but author Mike Sowell takes these and crafts an even be [...]

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    2. 4.5 Stars The Pitch that Killed, by Mike Sowell, is a true story of a Cleveland Indians shortstop, Ray Chapman, who was hit in the head by Yankee pitcher, Carl Mays during play on August 15, 1920. Chapman, known as "Chappie", by his teammates and, well, everyone, died in the early hours the next morning. Luckily this is the only time a player was killed by a pitched ball in Major League Baseball. Needless to say, the suddenness of Chappie's death devastated his recently wedded and pregnant wife, [...]

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    3. Very well-written and detailed account of the death of Ray Chapman, who died when a pitch by Carl Mays hit him in the head. Sowell does a good job of bringing the reader inside of the baseball world in the late 1910s and early 1920s. Some games are recalled almost in box score-like fashion. I'd recommend this to sports fans.

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    4. Whereas accounts of the Black Sox scandal of 1919 feel like ancient history to me, Sowell makes this book about the 1920 season seem modern. The moment we lose Ray Chapman in the story is heartbreaking. You feel the loss although every person in the story is long since dead. I had heard of Chapman previously, but I didn't know he was so popular. He was just an answer to a trivia question. It turns out that he was funny and humble and married to an heiress. 1920 may have even been his last season [...]

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    5. In 1920, major league baseball player Ray Chapman was killed by a pitch made by Carl Mays. This book tells the backstory of the players involved in this tragic event as well as that of the year’s pennant race. Notable names, such as Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb, make an appearance to give the story context. I had mixed feeling about this book. On the plus side: • I learned the details about this tragedy, which ultimately led to mandatory use of batting helmets many years later • It was interestin [...]

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    6. A gripping account of one of Basball's watershed seasons, this book unaccountably sat on my shelf for about three years; I only dusted it off after reading HEART OF THE GAME, a book about another Baseball fatality. Like the later book, this book traces the paths taken by the main protagonists, Carl Mays, the man who threw the fatal pitch, and Ray Chapman, the man whose career was cut so drastically short: further, it puts the event into the context of what has to be one of Baseball's most eventf [...]

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    7. The setup could not have been any more dramatic and poignant if it had been scripted: Ray Chapman was an excellent shortstop and very personable player (even Ty Cobb liked him!) and was in what was rumored to be the last year of his major league career: he has just married Kathleen Daly, daughter of a prominent Cleveland businessman, and it looked as if he would retire at the end of the season to devote himself to his new family and the family business. He had at various times led the Indians in [...]

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    8. An engrossing and fascinating story of the tragically sad end to the life of one of baseball's most popular players Ray Chappie Chapman.The book chronicles the 1920 pennant race in the American League and brings to life the personalities of greats like Tris Speaker and his Cleveland team that beat the Babe and his Yankee team despite the death of their shortstop in August.It is a little known story that grabs your heart because you know that no matter how much you hope for a change in the histor [...]

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    9. This book is extremely well-researched, well-written, informative, and also very depressing. I am glad to have read it, but will be gladder when more time has passed so that I don't feel this close to the events that happened. Hard to say "I really liked it" or "it was amazing," but I don't believe this sad story could possibly have been told any better. Will go ahead and give it the 5 stars on that basis.

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    10. One of the best books on baseball I have ever read, (and thats saying a lot) It is a story of Ray Chapman (the only player to die during a major league baseball game) and the man who threw the fatal pitch Carl Mays. It is as the cover promo stated the best baseball book no one has ever read. Dont make that mistake, find a copy and read it.

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    11. I think my abandonment of this book says more about me than about the book or it's author. This is clearly a meticulously researched book, told in a lively, sports columnist's fashion. I found that I just didn't care enough about the 1920 pennant race to re-live it, game by game.

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    12. An absolutely fantastic book. Very informative.Learned so much about the 2 main playersinvolved. Also learned a lot about the gameof baseball itself at the time. A must readfor all fans of baseball!

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    13. One of the greatest books written about baseball, it's a must read for me every year during spring training.

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    14. Enjoyable account of the 1920 season and, obviously, centered around the fatal beaning of Ray Chapman by Carl Mays. As always with books of this type, context is everything and this narrative covers the nuances of he season in some detail. The author certainly paints the picture of Chapman being the popular hero felled by the unlikable and somewhat surly Mays. It's hard to imagine now but the game and safety was certainly different then: no batting helmets for example. It was the time of Ruth an [...]

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    15. An absolutely brilliant work. The 1920 Cleveland Indians are one of my favorite teams not just for their overcoming of tragedy, but for their resolve to stay afloat and win one of the tightest pennant races in baseball history.The manner in which Sowell introduces his players- Chapman, Mays, Tris Speaker, Babe Ruth and ultimately Joe Sewell is just flawless. He spins an incredibly detailed narrative that seems so perfectly sewn together that the reader might believe he was present at every momen [...]

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    16. When I finished Grisham's Calico Joe a couple of weeks ago, I googled the title character to see whether Grisham was making this stuff up or whether there really was such a tragic baseball beaning as he described - Grisham's book is fiction, but my search lead me to Mike Sowell's "The Pitch that Killed, about the fatal beaning of Cleveland's star SS, Ray Chapman in 1920, during a hot pennant race with the Yankees by NYY pitcher Carl Mays.Sowell's story reads like the sports pages as he follows t [...]

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    17. 1989 CASEY Award Winner1989 New York Times Notable Book of the YearBriefly: CinematicFew seasons carried the drama of 1920, the year in which the Red Sox sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees; Ruth set a new home run record; the Black Sox scandal broke; Kenesaw Mountain Landis became the first commissioner of baseball; the spitball was banned; and Carl Mays hit Ray Chapman with the only pitch to ever kill a man. The story feels made for cinema, yet it carries the weight of history. Set in the storybook [...]

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    18. A very well-written book by Sowell on the only pitch that has ever killed a Major League baseballl player. The pitch was thrown by Carl Mays, while Ray Chapman of the Cleveland Indians, was hit and died a few hours later. The book also talks about the 1920 pennant race, which the Indians tried to win for Chapman after he died (I won't give the ending away). An important and good read for any baseball fan, not just Cleveland Indians fans. Some good stories in this book on Joe Sewell, Babe Ruth an [...]

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    19. As a lifelong Indians fan I knew about this incident but didn't find out until a couple of months ago about the book. I love books on baseball history and this didn't disappoint. It was well researched and written. Mike Sowell builds the story wonderfully up to the beaning. I cried after it happened. The pennant race was very exciting to read. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would recommend it to any baseball fan.

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    20. Appropriately subtitled "The Story of Carl Mays, Ray Chapman, and the Pennant Race of 1920"; the death of Indians infielder Chapman from a beanball thrown by Mays is the event around which this biography, sports and cultural history pivots, and its value is contained in that comprehensive examination of the lives and careers of the major and minor characters, the sport, a community and a country in a moment in time.

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    21. A book that had been on my "to read" list for years. A great evocation of baseball and how it was played at the very end of the dead ball era. Carl Mays was a fascinating character and one of the things about him I found most fascinating was how he handled a terrible situation for which he felt he was not to blame (rightly I think) yet which obviously haunted him in his life.

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    22. Wow, what a great baseball book! My only issue--it brought about serious questions of its historical accuracy, given that it reads so smoothly. It reads very much like a novel. Very quick read. Sowell brings you right into the excitement of the Indians/White Sox/Yankees pennant race of 1920. The research is thorough and the writing is beautiful.

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    23. Riveting account of the killing of Ray Chapman by Carl Mays, the maligned and quixotic Yankee pitcher during the Indians run to the 1920 World Series. Immaculately researched and written, Sowell's account is not only gripping but speaks to the historical importance of the game as an integral part of American culture in the early part of the 20th century.

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    24. Riveting. I'm probably utterly unable to review this book objectively - I love baseball, love history, love baseball history, and am an obsessive Cleveland Indians fan - but Sowell does an amazing job weaving the narrative of the 1920 season.

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    25. Ray Chapman, a shortstop for the Cleveland Indians, was killed by a piched ball in 1920. The story not only tells Chapman's story, but also about baseball in the early years and the Indians' World Championship season of 1920.

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    26. Quick review: Good book, sad but interesting story. Fine sports writing but not eloquent like, say, a Mark Frost. I recommend it to baseball fans who love the history of the game. THE PITCH THAT KILLED by Mike Sowell will satisfy you, just not enthrall you.

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    27. A must read for baseball fans. A thorough account of the 1920 A.L. pennant race. Quite a bit of biographical info on Ray Chapman, Carl Mays, Tris Speaker as well as the Indians, Yankees, and the rest of the American League. A treasure trove of anecdotal information.

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    28. Simply on of the best baseball books ever. A must read.

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    29. Great book about one of the most tragic events in baseball history.

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    30. Classic account of the 1920 Cleveland Indians season. Must read.

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