Chicken Every Sunday: My Life with Mother's Boarders

  • Title: Chicken Every Sunday: My Life with Mother's Boarders
  • Author: Rosemary Taylor Donald Mackay
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 242
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Chicken Every Sunday My Life with Mother s Boarders One of the boarders who ate Mother s chicken every Sunday summed it up when he said I was told that in your house I d have good food and some fun They all had fun and they all became part of the fam
    One of the boarders who ate Mother s chicken every Sunday summed it up when he said, I was told that in your house I d have good food and some fun They all had fun, and they all became part of the family Jeffrey, who lost his front teeth and won his independence, Rita Vlasak, who loved anything in pants, including Father, Miss Sally, who loved Miss Sally and cold creOne of the boarders who ate Mother s chicken every Sunday summed it up when he said, I was told that in your house I d have good food and some fun They all had fun, and they all became part of the family Jeffrey, who lost his front teeth and won his independence, Rita Vlasak, who loved anything in pants, including Father, Miss Sally, who loved Miss Sally and cold cream, the Lathams, who bought a mine, and even the hell bent for heaven Woolleys, who were sure God had sent the skunk to hide under the house because the family didn t go to church on Sunday If you have room for some fun and old fashioned enjoyment, Mother s sure to have room for you.

    • ☆ Chicken Every Sunday: My Life with Mother's Boarders || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Rosemary Taylor Donald Mackay
      242 Rosemary Taylor Donald Mackay
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Chicken Every Sunday: My Life with Mother's Boarders || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Rosemary Taylor Donald Mackay
      Posted by:Rosemary Taylor Donald Mackay
      Published :2019-04-14T22:16:33+00:00

    About Rosemary Taylor Donald Mackay


    1. Rosemary Taylor Donald Mackay Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Chicken Every Sunday: My Life with Mother's Boarders book, this is one of the most wanted Rosemary Taylor Donald Mackay author readers around the world.


    592 Comments


    1. What a charmingly delicious memoir!!! I could almost taste the traditional southern fare and authentic Mexican dishes prevalent throughout Rosemary Taylor's compilation of family stories. So be forewarned: Don't read this on an empty stomach. Or you'll be drooling onto the pages. Oh, and laugh!! The family antics are hysterical. Each of which typically involve "Mother" and her boarders, in some capacity or another. Let me just say, "Mother" (originally from Virginia) is ever the contemporary wom [...]

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    2. I found this book delightful. It reminded me of all that I loved about Cheaper by the Dozen's quick and witty character development and turn of the century narrative style had me from page 1. I can't say that I wish I had her life, but I will admit to wishing mine were as colorful! (And okay, I suppose I do wish I were a little more like Rosemary's motherwhat a lady!)

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    3. A witty autobiography/memoir written in 1945 by a woman who grew up in her mother's rooming house in Tucson Arizona during the days when the 'desert cure' was prescribed by illnesses right and left. The family itself is zany and quirky, the boarders add another element of wackiness that make this family's life seem like one big circus and picnic.The children can't imagine life without boarders while the hard-working mother is always hoping that someday her ne'er do well husband will finally pull [...]

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    4. I really enjoyed this book. It is full of wonderful character sketches. I find it interesting that the characters of some of the boarders are better developed than those of the children. Mother of course is my favorite. She made me start thinking of all the ways to earn a little extra money. I think my favorite chapter was the one that talked about the secret to successful boarding. I think it is so true of anyone. I think we all know of homes we are welcome in and those we are not. I could have [...]

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    5. I heard about this book on NPR. Apparently, it was a particular favorite of WWII soldiers serving overseas because it had wonderful descriptions of home cooking when the soldiers had nothing but icky rations. I found the stories to be about 95 percent charming anecdotes about the antics of an active family at the beginning of the 1900s, and living with boarders. Father seemed like a bit of a shyster: he never heard of a deal that he didn't want in on, and didn't scruple to invest every penny of [...]

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    6. I really liked this book I thought it had some good humor in it. I enjoyed the meaning behind it and the service it taught of. I think that this will be a book that I may read again someday. I really liked some of the advise that it gave, I used some of it. The one about the onion works pretty well. If you can remember it. I don't want to give it away at all. I thought it funny how the mom would put her boarders before her children in that they would sleep on the porch. That is all I am going to [...]

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    7. A book I have picked up and read more than once, first when I was a child and more than once as an adult. The boarders in this book are a great variety and are looked at from the child's point of view. It is interesting reading about the mother, she is a superhero. The straightforward manner in which the mother looks after her family, fighting against all adversity, especially her spouse is inspirational.

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    8. Fun little historical memoir, pleasant in an antiquated way. It's a fun and funny window into life in "old Tucson", in the days when the West was being settled and everyone from the rest of the country was running off to sunny Arizona for weather cures. Sweet and light.

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    9. Fun comfort read, though a little dated.

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    10. I found this book because it was identified as a favorite with the US troops during WWII, in "When books went to war". It's an affectionate memoir of a family living in Tucson in the early 20th century. Father is an inveterate dealmaker, always off on his next business venture/get rich quick scheme. Mother, always remembering her hardscrabble early years as the daughter of plantation owners ruined by the Civil War, makes her own money by taking in boarders and catering Mexican-style food for var [...]

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    11. My husband and I lived in the Chicken Every Sunday house for three years while we were newlywed grad students at U of A in the early 1980s. The house was no longer in the author's family by then. It was owned by a business woman who had her office on one side of the building while the other half had been divided into two separate apartments. There were two other small outbuildings on the property which were rented out as well. It was fun reading the book all these years after having lived there [...]

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    12. XX I looked for this book after reading a review by Pamela. Thank you, Pam! Published in 1943, I was very lucky to locate a copy, order and receive it, and find time to read it before my trip to see my son Mac and his family in Tucson. And it is a wonderful, special look at Tucson in the late '30's, early '40's. The things that made Tucson special then, still exist today. This is a very touching memoir, and one I am grateful to have absorbed. It is good to take a realistic look at yesterday occa [...]

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    13. This is a peach of a book, and is an excellent bit of Americana as well. It is one of my favorite nonfiction books.The author's parents were settlers in Arizona in the early 1900s. Her father was a wheeler-dealer who was fond of speculating with his money. So, to provide for her family, the mother began takin in boarders. From that point on, the fun began. From Jeffrey the poet who had teeth like Bugs Bunny, to tramps who marked the house with a hobo marker which read, "Good cook lives here!" Th [...]

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    14. After reading "When Books Went to War" I decided to read/reread the four books that were most popular with the GIs. This is one I'd never read. It was fun, it was clean - yet not without double entendres and minor risque elements. The descriptions of food (including Mexican food!) and the mother's managing ways probably reminded the soldiers of their own mothers. The details about the early development of Tucson were interesting, too. I'd compare this to "Cheaper By the Dozen" or "Mama's Bank Ac [...]

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    15. This was different from what I expected after reading the first few lines. I thought it would be funnier. I was enthralled that a book published in 1943 would start out talking so frankly about pre-marital sex.It was the story of all the boarders Rosemary's mother took in over the years and all the business "mis"adventures her father had.

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    16. Absolutely amazing. I've read it a hundred times over, and I still love it. I don't know what the appeal is- it seems, at first glance, vaguely interesting at best, but it is definitely a favorite of mine.

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    17. I read this book and enjoyed it a lot. It speaks to a happy time in our lives. It is witty and heart warming! The reason that I picked this book is because it was one of the stories so favored by our men and women in WWII who were stationed overseas during conflict. These little 6.5 & 4.5 pocket books could be carried in their pockets and they would take them out to read to bring a little relief from the shellings, bombings and waiting for battles. They read them in foxholes, boats, trenches [...]

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    18. Having grown up in a tired industrial town where a scandalous mixed-marriage meant a Pole was marrying an Italian, you can be assured that, as a wee child, I grew up hearing every politically and gender-related politically incorrect term for nearly every race of human on the planet. How far we've come (and thank heavens, too) that many of the terms used in this memoir of early 20th-century boardinghouse life made me once again blush with embarrassment. Taylor's 1943 memoir, though, was such a ho [...]

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    19. A humorous story of a slightly dysfunctional family, where the mother saves pennies (including by taking in boarders) and the father gambles on get rich schemes. The push and pull is marked by their children, and leads to more than one incident-- boarders who warn of divine punishment, who suffer from marriage woes, or have money to invest. Funny and touching, full of rich detail and love for the foibles of family life.

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    20. My mother told me, that her mother told her, that this book was about “our family” the woman in the book was the daughter of a woman who was a Virginia Claiborne.Story was a lot of fun, and more about Tucson, in the early days.

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    21. Certainly dated, but I enjoyed the book. Knowing it was the most requested book among soldiers during World War II, I wanted to know what they were reading before, during and after battles. Life was different then. The book reminds me of how things have changed.

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    22. Great story! Sad to see this wonderful book becoming obscure in favor of some of the crap they write these days

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    23. I wanted to read this story because the Armed Services Edition of the book was apparently wildly popular with GIs during World War II. I can understand why. Set in Tucson, AZ, in the early years of the 20th Century, it's a mostly gentle little slice of nostalgia. Author Rosemary Taylor lovingly describes her mother's cooking, the landscape of the Arizona desert, her father's many financial adventures, and she also relates some charming stories about the many boarders her ever-industrious mother [...]

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    24. Rosemary Taylor presents growing up in a boarding house in Arizona in a nostalgic, quaint, and funny way. This book evokes images of family life gone by, in a similar way to Life With Father. The descriptions of Mother's cooking and ability to use every bit of food makes me envious. The bit about the overbearing mother and her poet son who is obsessed with dying has a very satisfying ending. The story about the maid and her abusive husband, and what Mother did to "fix" her is very shocking, espe [...]

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    25. This is a fun old book. Written in the early 40's, the style is simple and energetic. It's meant to be enjoyed by all audiences.But, it's not so much about the boarders, it's more about the relationship between Mother and Father. They are a loving couple all right, but still there is some salt and crust in between to make it interesting.And what's not told here, but this reader has gleaned, is this is one of the founding families of Tucson. Today, there are many places in that city with this fam [...]

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    26. I read this book last year and picked it up again. Thoroughly enjoyable story, told well. There is nothing better than a first hand account of history and everyday social commentary from another time. Beats someone writing about how they think it was way back when based on research every time. I would think it would be a popular book out in Arizona since it covers an early period in Arizona history.

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    27. This was a hilarious book. The stories were just fun. I found myself laughing out loud. The mother was a very smart woman who found clever ways to make money to support her family. The boarders were also very fun and entertaining. This boarding house is a place that I really would have liked to stay at.

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    28. Another book from my aunt's library. I learned so much history from reading all those books from t he 40's, in a way a history book could never convey. Life in turn of the century and later Tuscon. Miss Taylor's mother ran a boarding house, but really, all the boarders became members of the family. Great read.

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    29. Loved it! Loved it! Loved it! It was so refreshing to read a book about such an interesting time in the southwest. I wish this were available on Kindle. I think it would be great for it to be available to a wider audience.

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    30. A wonderful, charming book that delighted me to the last page. This book was made into a movie. We happened to buy the DVD before I ever bought the book (but have yet to watch it). I look forward in anticipation to see how Hollywood transformed the written word to the "Silver Screen".

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