The Wife of Bath

  • Title: The Wife of Bath
  • Author: Geoffrey Chaucer
  • ISBN: 9780141398099
  • Page: 363
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Wife of Bath Those husbands that I had Three of them were good and two were bad The three that I call good were rich and old One of the most bawdy entertaining and popular stories from The Canterbury Tales Intro
    Those husbands that I had, Three of them were good and two were bad The three that I call good were rich and old One of the most bawdy, entertaining and popular stories from The Canterbury Tales Introducing Little Black Classics 80 books for Penguin s 80th birthday Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from Those husbands that I had, Three of them were good and two were bad The three that I call good were rich and old One of the most bawdy, entertaining and popular stories from The Canterbury Tales Introducing Little Black Classics 80 books for Penguin s 80th birthday Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries They take us from a balloon ride over Victorian London to a garden of blossom in Japan, from Tierra del Fuego to 16th century California and the Russian steppe Here are stories lyrical and savage poems epic and intimate essays satirical and inspirational and ideas that have shaped the lives of millions Geoffrey Chaucer c.1343 1400 Chaucer s works available in Penguin Classics are The Canterbury Tales, Love Visions and Troilus and Criseyde.

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      Posted by:Geoffrey Chaucer
      Published :2019-08-06T15:43:47+00:00

    About Geoffrey Chaucer


    1. Geoffrey Chaucer c 1343 October 25, 1400 was an English author, poet, philosopher, bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat Although he wrote many works, he is best remembered for his unfinished frame narrative The Canterbury Tales Sometimes called the father of English literature, Chaucer is credited by some scholars as being the first author to demonstrate the artistic legitimacy of the vernacular English language, rather than French or Latin.


    190 Comments


    1. I wouldn’t want to be a medieval wife Well I don’t want to be any sort of wife, but that’s beside the point! What I’m trying to say is that medieval womanhood wasn’t a good form. This wife was forced to marry at twelve years of age, twelve years of age, and since then has married five times; thus, she considers herself somewhat of an authority on marriage. And who can argue, she clearly has more experience than most:Middle-English Version "Experience, though noon auctoriteeWere in this [...]

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    2. I really liked the essays dealing with the content of the text, but Mr Beidler himself is rather pedantic for me, rambling on and on about the authenticity of this copy and that copy of the various manuscripts that still exist of this text. He seems to be really a hard-core hardcore Chaucer super specialist, giving background on the debates around the origins of the various manuscripts.I see this edition is not linked to other editions of Chaucer's The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale, so I'm go [...]

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    3. Since there has been such a spate of reviews on recently, attending to texts that contain the depiction of female masochistic tendencies, I decided to go all the way and go way back to the first text we know of in English that contains this, being Geoffrey Chaucer's Wife of Bath's prologue and tale.Both the tale and prologue depicts violence visited upon women, and in the prologue, it is initially even welcomed by the woman, for love of the man inflicting the violence; but just like Ana in 50 S [...]

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    4. Geoffrey Chaucer was an English 14th Century diplomat and philosopher amongst other things, though is best known for being a Poet and writing the Canterbury Tales. The Canterbury Tales were written during the 100 years war and tell of a group of pilgrims on they way to Canterbury Cathedral to visit the shrine of Thomas Beckett, with the prize being a free meal at an inn. "You say it's torture to endure her prideAnd melancholy airs, and more besides. And if she had a pretty face, old traitor, You [...]

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    5. Now I remember why I do not like poetry, at school my poetry was considered to be good.Why don't I like it? The teacher would say when you can write like Chaucer then you have mastered the art. Really! His writing is just cheap rhyming from 8 year olds. Whilst the story is interesting his ability is lacking, give the children a chance, there are far better poets in schools than himS we were made to read this in school and we, even to this day cannot see what is special. This man killed some chil [...]

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    6. Dear Authors of certain books,Before you write that book with thinly disguised rape between the two leads, I really think you should read this.Honesty.Thank you.

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    7. Read all my reviews on urlphantomhiveoklikes We didn't read this in class. Of course, we talked about the Canterbury Tales but actually reading it, no. That's why I was pleased to see it as a part of the Little Black Classics, giving me the opportunity to read a small part without necessary the feeling that I should read it all.The story surprised me in a positive way. Both the Prologue and the actual Tale were far more interesting than anticipated. I'd thought it would be drier and The Wife fel [...]

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    8. The wife of Bath is so outrageous in her views its hilarious. there is being a feminist and then there is The Wife of Bath, she takes manipulating men to a whole other level.

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    9. The Wife of Bath, Alison, who has been married 5 times, justifies this scandalous behavior using knowledge gained from priests and erudite dead husbands, one of whom hit her and left her partly deaf. There's an argument for interpreting the Wife of Bath as a proto-feminist, but to me, it feels like she doesn't want to end up alone and vulnerable so she uses the phrases that most suit her cause, ignoring that most of them are sexist. She tell the tale of a knight from King Arthur's court who rape [...]

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    10. First Chaucer I have read I am ashamed to say and I was surprised to find I enjoyed this - may even encourage me to read more of the Canterbury Tales

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    11. She’s the archetypal Dominatrix, and she was created over seven hundred years ago in the fourteenth century by Geoffrey Chaucer. She’s the “Wife of Bath,” and she knew a thing or two about making men behave themselves. Usually, I look to the Greek myths, when I’m searching around for an archetype. Certainly, the myths have their share of strong women, women who really were downright superior to men. The terrifying Medusa, who could turn men, and anyone else for that matter, into stone. [...]

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    12. I liked it but since the language was modernized I'd like to read some original Chaucer. I remember hating reading him in school but maybe I was just having a bad week then. I'd be curious to see if I'd like it now. This version was certainly entertaining.

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    13. Continuing my reading of the Canterbury Tales in sections, we come to Fragment III, which contains the prologue and tales for The Wife of Bath, The Friar and The Summoner. Of course the Wife is the star of this section in fact, she's probably the star of the whole collection, so vividly is she brought to life. This is a woman who plays life by men's rules - she wants sex, she wants money, she wants control over her own destiny. In Chaucer's day, men could have all these, but women were either s [...]

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    14. Will write a review once I've read a few essays on this.

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    15. When you see the publication date of 1372, you would expect literature dry as dust. In rhymes. And language none understands. Well, bless “translators” who put works like this into more modern words. Because as it turns out, they are actually quite enjoyable. This one in particular reaches Shakespearean levels of sass and clever word play. I am pretty sure I did not catch all the sexual innuendo, either. But it is humorous and quick to read, the melody of the rhymes is very easy to follow. T [...]

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    16. 1.5 would have been ideal, and I decided to round up rather than round below, perhaps because it's great Chaucer. I am not moving on with too many positive feelings from reading this.I don't particularly endorse (perhaps verging on neutrality) the concept of womanhood that Chaucer portrays. The bravery of the text, however, is striking, i.e, for 1300-something.I'd need to go through more critical matter before being able to cement an opinion. Hence, this review may very well change in times to c [...]

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    17. A better selection could have been picked, but this one was not as bad as expected. "Those husbands that I had,Three of them were good and two were bad.The three that I call "good"were rich and old." Luckily, this was not dry poetry, Chaucer is always good on delivering beautifully dripping prose.  

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    18. Chaucer was one of the very first authors I had to read when I started English Studies at Uni and I highly enjoyed him. The Wife of Bath was a re-read for me and it was as good as the first time I read it, maybe even better.

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    19. Subbing today so I had to read "The Wyf of Bath" aloud to students. And naturally I felt obliged to reciteThe Prologue to Canterbury Tales in Middle English for them. Hadn't had much occasion to use that bit of knowledge in a while!

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    20. 'Those husbands that I had,Three of them were good and two were bad.The three that I call "good"were rich and old.'I studied about him in college and I wanted to read some of his work, It's entertaining and fun, though I didn't understand it all."

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    21. Definitely not my favorite, but a little better content-wise than The Miller's Tale.

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    22. Review to come.Rating - 1/5★

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    23. The Wife of Bath's tale and her prologue are some of the best parts of The Canterbury Tales. The prologue describes the character of Alison and her marriages and is much longer than the tale she tells.I've looked into critical perspectives having done a short presentation on the Prologue, and I may do a research essay as there is such a wide range of readings, from one end of the feminist spectrum to the other. Alison is a "satirical deconstruction of the fourteenth century female", she is "not [...]

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    24. A bold and daring book. With a very strong female character. Alison is a true feminist of that time. I loved this book especially the prologue. And the notion of women yearning for freedom is so apt. A marvelous book.

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    25. Snarky, tongue -in -cheek, incredibly modern tale.

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    26. The Wife of Bath is a boss.

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    27. I'm really surprised I liked this, I don't usually like books that I have to read for school/college but this was a pleasant surprise. And it doesn't hurt that it's a really short story.

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    28. Chaucer is a very interesting poet. The prologue to the Canterbury Tales is a great piece of poetry. The Wife of Bath is also a delightful character, and the poem itself can be surprisingly subversive. The Wife of Bath talks openly about her amorous exploits and seems to have agency in her relationships. That was the prologue though. The tale is much more problematic. There are some photo-feminist elements, but, the tale isn't perfect and can be misogynistic. Despite all of that I enjoyed the Wi [...]

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    29. This is one of the most well known of the Canterbury Tales. Alyson, the Wife of Bath, has the most interesting prologue in the entire book as she tells of her many husbands, her own appetites, and how she accuses society while making a defense of her actions. The tale itself is a pretty standard medieval romance story with a modern twist that paints femininity in a more positive light than most medieval literature.

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    30. This tale is one of the most iconic of the Canterbury Tales, and it definitely lives up to it's reputation. I personally enjoy the fantastical elements of the tale itself and the layers this piece has! You could read it a few times and still find something new to note especially in conjunction with her prologue.

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