Stained Glass Elegies

  • Title: Stained Glass Elegies
  • Author: Shūsaku Endō Van C. Gessel
  • ISBN: 9780811211420
  • Page: 412
  • Format: Paperback
  • Stained Glass Elegies The arresting beauty of Shusaku Endo s fiction is best known in the West through his highly acclaimed novels The Samurai and Silence His consummately wrought short stories with their worlds of deep s
    The arresting beauty of Shusaku Endo s fiction is best known in the West through his highly acclaimed novels The Samurai and Silence His consummately wrought short stories, with their worlds of deep shadows and achieved clarity, are less familiar The dozen stories of Stained Glass Elegies, selected by the author together with his translator, display the full range of EndThe arresting beauty of Shusaku Endo s fiction is best known in the West through his highly acclaimed novels The Samurai and Silence His consummately wrought short stories, with their worlds of deep shadows and achieved clarity, are less familiar The dozen stories of Stained Glass Elegies, selected by the author together with his translator, display the full range of Endo s talents in short fiction.

    • [PDF] Download ☆ Stained Glass Elegies | by ↠ Shūsaku Endō Van C. Gessel
      412 Shūsaku Endō Van C. Gessel
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ Stained Glass Elegies | by ↠ Shūsaku Endō Van C. Gessel
      Posted by:Shūsaku Endō Van C. Gessel
      Published :2019-09-23T08:45:15+00:00

    About Shūsaku Endō Van C. Gessel


    1. Shusaku Endo , born in Tokyo in 1923, was raised by his mother and an aunt in Kobe where he converted to Roman Catholicism at the age of eleven At Tokyo s Keio University he majored in French literature, graduating BA in 1949, before furthering his studies in French Catholic literature at the University of Lyon in France between 1950 and 1953 A major theme running through his books, which have been translated into many languages, including English, French, Russian and Swedish, is the failure of Japanese soil to nurture the growth of Christianity Before his death in 1996, Endo was the recipient of a number of outstanding Japanese literary awards the Akutagawa Prize, Mainichi Cultural Prize, Shincho Prize, and Tanizaki Prize from the backcover of Volcano.


    842 Comments


    1. 3.5 stars.The title of this 11-story collection "Stained Glass Elegies" by Shusaku Endo reminded me of Thomas Grey's "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard" in which [Thai translation first by เสฐียรโกเศศ] its fine Thai poem "กลอนดอกสร้อยรำพึงในป่าช้า" (epacpunyaphat.weebly/uploa) by พระยาอุปกิตศิลปสาร (นิ่ม กาญจนาชีวะ) we studied in a Thai language textbook req [...]

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    2. Stained Glass Elegies is a compilation of 11 short stories that Endo wrote between 1959 and 1977, which were largely taken from his earlier short story collections Aika (Elegies) and Juichi no iro garasu (Eleven Stained-Glass Segments). Most of the stories touch on Endo's main themes: chronic illness and death; the indifference and paternalism that patients in the modern hospital are afforded; the effect of barbarism and imperialism on Catholics in feudal and wartime Japan; and the internal stru [...]

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    3. There is a lot of beauty, self reflection and reflection of life in this book. It is commented in the Introduction that some of the characters in 'Silence' are formed in these short stories, and having seen the film adaptation I can relate these stories to that and visualise the culmination of Endo's musings on the Christian faith. This has definitely inspired me to read that longer work. However, I've only given it four stars due to the repetitiveness of themes, which has been commented on in p [...]

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    4. Favorites: Unzen, Old Friends, War Generation, Mothers, A Forty Year-Old Man Least Favorite: Incredible Journey Now let's talk about this.By far, it's my first read on Endo, and I was surprisingly appalled by the quality of his words, somehow washed clean from my memories about Kawabata and Mishima. It's also a little bit Western, but predominantly Japanese with the perspective pitched on stories about one's spirituality in the modern world. Though he strikes close to Kawabata, he's a lot more c [...]

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    5. “[On sleepless nights] I lie in the darkness and think about the past. When I close my eyes, the faces of people I had completely forgotten slowly float up one after another like bubbles in water. Half of them are already dead, and of those that are still alive, I have no idea where most of them are now, or what they are doing. I muse over each of those faces until I fall asleep; and I realize how old I have become. At some point I will die. I wonder if someone on a sleepless night will think [...]

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    6. They say write what you know—and despite being culled from two different short story collections, on the evidence here, Endō's writing is overwhelmingly autobiographical. The stories here tend to fall into two kinds: those dealing with a man coping with an extended hospital stay for a lung problem (as Endō had to endure) or those dealing with a man thinking back over his Catholic youth and how it relates to the experience of Christian martyrs in Japan in an earlier era. So while the stories [...]

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    7. Endo writes vividly about the history of Christian martyrdom in Japan and his own personal experience of the pain of middle life in this short story collection.While I love Endo's writing, I liked some of the stories in this anthology more than others. Since most of them were autobiographical, they became repetitive, especially where Endo's stay in the hospital and several lung surgeries were concerned. The ones I enjoyed the most were "Despicable Bastard," in which a man goes along with his sup [...]

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    8. Is your faith strong enough to withstand repeated beatings, starvation, torture and all the myriad of methods, one human being can devise to hurt and scar another?What if, they came for your family, friends, or even your neighbours?Now what if come this moment, this brutal challenge to your beliefs, you are offered a way out, (no questions asked), just renounce your god, stomp on some old relics of your faith and walk away.You've survived, your free.But then what? There was your family & fri [...]

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    9. It shouldn't be too much of a surprise, I guess, but Endo is truly obsessed with the idea of martyrdom in these 11 short stories. Thematically it gets old quickly. Every other story involves someone in a hospital thinking about martyrdom, someone doing research on martyrdom, or someone visiting Christian/Pagan sects who have sequestered themselves on remote Japanese islands. His interest in the body, its physical limits and sacramental tangibility would be natural for a Catholic. To that end, I [...]

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    10. A rather mediocre, repetitive collection. If you wish to read 'Silence' 10 more times, have a blast.

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    11. Subtle short stories which have links to a lot of Endo's other writings and themes explored more fully in his novels

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    12. I couldn't finish it :(

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