Pentimento

  • Title: Pentimento
  • Author: Lillian Hellman
  • ISBN: 9780316352888
  • Page: 231
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pentimento In this widely praised follow up to her National Book Award winning first volume of memoirs An Unfinished Woman the legendary playwright Lillian Hellman looks back at some of the people who witting
    In this widely praised follow up to her National Book Award winning first volume of memoirs, An Unfinished Woman, the legendary playwright Lillian Hellman looks back at some of the people who, wittingly or unwittingly, exerted profound influence on her development as a woman and a writer The portraits include Hellman s recollection of a lifelong friendship that began in cIn this widely praised follow up to her National Book Award winning first volume of memoirs, An Unfinished Woman, the legendary playwright Lillian Hellman looks back at some of the people who, wittingly or unwittingly, exerted profound influence on her development as a woman and a writer The portraits include Hellman s recollection of a lifelong friendship that began in childhood, reminiscences that formed the basis of the Academy Award winning film Julia.

    • ↠ Pentimento || ç PDF Download by ↠ Lillian Hellman
      231 Lillian Hellman
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ Pentimento || ç PDF Download by ↠ Lillian Hellman
      Posted by:Lillian Hellman
      Published :2019-06-19T21:32:37+00:00

    About Lillian Hellman


    1. Lillian Florence Lilly Hellman June 20, 1905 June 30, 1984 was an American dramatist and screenwriter famously blacklisted by the House Committee on Un American Activities HUAC at the height of the anti communist campaigns of 1947 52.Hellman was praised for sacrificing her career by refusing to answer questions by HUAC but her denial that she had ever belonged to the Communist Party was easily disproved, and her veracity was doubted by many, including war correspondent Martha Gellhorn and literary critic Mary McCarthy.She adapted her semi autobiographical play The Little Foxes into a screenplay which received an Academy Award nomination in 1942.Hellman was romantically involved with fellow writer and political activist Dashiell Hammett for thirty years until his death from


    898 Comments


    1. "Old paint on canvas, as it ages, sometimes becomes trasparent. When that happens it is possible, in some pictures, to see the original lines: a tree will show through a woman's dress, a child manes way for a dog, a large boat is no longer on an open sea. That is called pentimento because the painter "repented," changed his mind. Perhaps it would be as well to say the old conception, replaced by a later choice, is a way of seeing and then seeing again." This is how Lillian Hellman starts her mem [...]

      Reply

    2. The concept behind this memoir, as hinted by its title, is unique if not an original.A pentimento (plural pentimenti) is an alteration in a painting, evidenced by traces of previous work, showing that the artist has changed his or her mind as to the composition during the process of painting. The word is Italian for repentance, from the verb pentirsi, meaning to repent.Then the author applied it to her life by writing this memoir of the people she used to know. Really used to know.Lillian Hellma [...]

      Reply

    3. Many times I buy a book based on the first page. This is what I found in this book, why I read it and why I love it still:"Old paint on a canvas, as it ages, sometimes becomes transparent. When that happens it is possible, in some pictures, to see the original lines: a tree will show through a woman's dress, a child makes way for a dog, a large boat is no longer on an open sea. That is called 'pentimento' because the painter 'repented,' changed his mind. Perhaps it would be as well to say that t [...]

      Reply

    4. This was a re-read. I knew I liked the book but couldn't remember much about it except that Dashiell Hammett had been persecuted by Joe McCarthy. Now I know why I liked it. It's a gem. It presents numerous people from Hellman's life -- well drawn but with details missing, as they would be in normal life; we never know everything about another person. Hellman doesn't fill in those gaps. She lets us see for ourselves and judge for ourselves. There are hilarious parts (the condoms!) and wrenching o [...]

      Reply

    5. I loved this book. Every single page of it. It's not about Hellman's great successes and failures, her great loves or her true heart breaks. It is about people that touched her life at times when she, for whatever reason (too young, too busy, too worried, too heartbroken, too drunk), could not figure them out. Which is to say, she didn't understand at the time of the relationship what motivated these people to do what they did, or how they did what they did or why. Mixed in with actual people is [...]

      Reply

    6. I have a 40 year old copy of this book in paperback. My Mother gave it to me. Lillian Hellman writes vividly of her life and times. She was a distinguished playwright during the era of Dorothy Parker and Tallulah Bankhead.Every time I read it, I am transported back in time.

      Reply

    7. Let brevity be the soul of this crit : pimento in baloney.

      Reply

    8. "Old paint on canvas, as it ages, sometimes becomes transparent. When that happens it is possible, in some pictures, to see the original lines: a tree will show through a woman's dress, a child makes way for a dog, a large boat is no longer on an open sea. That is called pentimento because the painter "repented," changed his mind. Perhaps it would be as well to say that the old conception, replaced by a later choice is a way of seeing and then seeing again."This book consists of several long ske [...]

      Reply

    9. Maybe 5 stars is a little over the top, but I'm on a Lillian Hellman bender at the moment. I did really love this book. I love the style of her writing and the way she speaks. You feel like you're sitting in a room with her having a drink and listening to her. Turtle made me laugh out loud. I'm not in any way shape or form into harming turtles you understand, it's the conversations between her and Hammett. "the turtle's gone"! "you drink too much in the morning". I loved the one about Arthur Cow [...]

      Reply

    10. Another set of memoirs from Lillian Hellman. Probably another pack of lies and half-truths from what I have read and heard in the last few years. This is the book the story "Julia" came from. Somewhere along the way I figured out that by comparing this and her previous book of memoirs you could figure out what Julia's real name was or at least who she was in the first book. Because when she first wrote the first book, she may not have known that she was going to write the second book.

      Reply

    11. This memoir by Lillian Hellman is one of my all time favorite. I still cherish my original copy from the 1980's. Each chapter reads like a short story. She was a fabulous writer. I first heard of her in medical school. Some friends and I went to Hancher Auditorium to see a woman who did a one-person show based on the book (like Hal Holbrook doing Mark Twain).

      Reply

    12. I love this book so much. I first read it when I was 16, obsessed with the relationship between Hellman and Dashiell Hammett. This is a snapshot into her life, people who touched her emotionally at varying times. I have read this pretty much every year, and it always moves me.

      Reply

    13. Very good book with historical value. Remarkable woman who showed courage during a time when most men hid their tails and ran.

      Reply

    14. An intimate conversation with a sometimes brutally honest Hellman—that’s how this book read to me. The title, Pentimento, refers to the “original lines: a tree will show through a woman’s dress, a child makes way for a dog, a large boat is no longer on an open sea” that appear once old paint fades and reveals what was drawn or painted under the painting. Hellman writes that it is a “way of seeing and then seeing again.” She uses this analogy to describe the way she looks back on he [...]

      Reply

    15. Pentimento: A Book of Portraits is electrfying in its earnestness and candor, incisive in its tone, acerbic in its wit and picturesque in its mental imagery - a memoir (unlike An Unfinished Woman) that is a bit more honed and focused and less formless in how the recollections and diary entries jump from one to the next. Be that as it may, let it not mitigate the merit of An Unfinished Woman, for in its own right, it is a very worthy read and most deserving of its National Book Award. Each chapte [...]

      Reply

    16. I loved this. The title itself is so brilliant - "pentimento" being when you are able to see the ghost traces of previous work in a painting, showing that the artist has changed his/her mind and painted over a previous idea. The word is Italian for "repentance," and in this book, Lillian is looking back and trying to find the old traces of memories of her past and the people she interacted with. There is a kind of repentance present, as well as a deep care for showing all sides of these complica [...]

      Reply

    17. "Old paint on a canvas, as it ages, sometimes becomes transparent. When that happens it is possible, in some pictures, to see the original lines: a tree will show through a woman's dress, a child makes way for a dog, a large boat is no longer on an open sea. That is called pentimento because the painter "repented," changed his mind. Perhaps it would be as well to say that the old conception, replaced by a later choice, is a way of seeing and then seeing again. That is all I mean about the people [...]

      Reply

    18. Beautifully written, compellingly told. The book is less an autobiography than it is a collection of personal essays. While I found it interesting to read about her fascinating life, further research says that most of this book is a lie. The famous tale of Julia (made into the wonderful movie with Jane Fonda and Vanessa Redgrave) apparently is total fiction, with Hellman appropriating a woman's persona (whom she didn't even know) and calling her Julia, then fabricating a story.

      Reply

    19. Not sure if it’s her writing or her life that would not let me put the book down. She was a most unusual woman that mixed with some history makers. She made some of that history herself.I’ll have to reread An Unfinished Woman now and watch a few of her movies.

      Reply

    20. I loved every sentence in this book. Now I'll read everything she wrote!

      Reply

    21. Remarkable memoir, stories told exquisitely.

      Reply

    22. Her relationship with Julia and Arthur Cowan were the most interesting characters in her book.

      Reply

    23. Excellent -- the only reason I give it four stars is because some stories (per usual) are better than others. However, like Faulkner's "Go Down Moses", there is a makeshift chronology in the ordering of the stories, although the stories themselves can go back and forth at will. I am accustomed to this, however by many of my favorite authors anyway, such as Toni Morrison and Faulkner. A few years ago, around age 37, I read Proust. I was, at that time, finally equipped to grasp the act of deeply l [...]

      Reply

    24. Presented as second volume of Hellman's memoirs. This one is 'A Book of Portraits'. She 'approached the idea of the self portrait obliquely, using portraits of others to imply a picture of herself'. I liked parts of this one. Tainted a bit with the Julia chapter. I thought the Arthur W. A. Cowan chapter revealed little to nothing of Lillian Hellman, but I thought the remainder made for an interesting read. I loved all the references of Dorothy Parker. Not sure much was revealed of Lillian, too o [...]

      Reply

    25. On Tallulah Bankhead and The Little Foxes: "She had been 'wild' about the play, wild enough to insist the consultation take place while she was in bed with John Emery and a bottle. [Herman] Shumlin said he didn't think Emery liked [it] that much, but he was certain that poor Emery was unprepared for Tallulah's saying to Herman as he rose to go, 'Wait a minute, darling, just wait a minute. I have something to show you.' She threw aside the sheets, pointed down at the naked, miserable Emery and sa [...]

      Reply

    26. Is there anywhere another writer so routinely vilified for being outspoken, heartfelt, incorrigible and oh yes, a woman?This amalgam of memories, of reveries and wisdom cut loose from chronology, but girded by wit, feeling and fierce intelligence deserves a far more respectful appraisal than it generally gets.Too bad for the saps, I say.

      Reply

    27. Lillian, la verdad no puedo con tu vida.

      Reply

    28. I would have enjoyed the book more if I hadn't looked it up on halfway through and learned there are questions about its truthfulness.

      Reply

    29. Again very slow reading. Didn't enjoy.

      Reply

    30. This was the second book that I read by Lillian Hellman and I think it is my favorite. It is one of the few memoirs where I actually hear the author's voice as she relates her memories of the people from her younger days. I did not get that sense in the other book that I read, An Unfinished Woman. The only memory remaining from that book is that it seemed to be about spending time at literary/theatre festivals in the Soviet Union and drinking a lot.My desire to read Pentimento was initially insp [...]

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *